Monday, March 23, 2009

rural grain silo home



Montesilo is the name of a unique home, built in 2006, that utilizes two corrugated metal grain silos in Woodland, Utah adjacent to the Provo River. Designed to accommodate the owner, Earl Stein, as well as future grandchildren, two linked corrugated metal grain silos were arranged to allow the largest (27’ diameter) to have the greatest access to the Provo River, and the southern exposure to ensure passive solar heat gain during the winter. An electric mesh is embedded into the slabs of the lower floor as a first auxiliary heat source, and a propane-burning stove (manageable by internet) will provide the back-up. The metal grating and guard rail of the second level deck will provide shading into this great-room space during the summer months.

Awards:
-Owners blog showing entire construction process.
-Arch Daily article





Footings installed


Foundation walls


Concrete slab finish


Metal silo assembled out of the box. The top was assembled first and then jacked up to add section below.


Inner wall built adjacent to metal silo. Window/Door openings were then cut out.


I would have liked to see natural light preserved through the oculus as shown in this construction photo rather than framing over and enclosing the opening.


“Bed in a Box” concept at perimeter, each complete with stereo sound and flat screen monitor.


Kitchen and Stair


View from the Provo River

Images obtained from Gigaplex Architects.

7 comments:

  1. That's really fun -- I was a bit surprised to see that it was a new build rather than a conversion of existing derelict buildings, which is what I thought when I first saw it.

    Also, how will the guardrail provide shade?

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  2. I agree that it would be nice to see an adaptation from an existing silo. Maybe this design will inspire someone...

    The shade will mostly come from the metal deck, rather than the guardrail. The placement is quite nice (above the 1st floor windows) to provide relief from direct sunlight entering the lower floor in the summer. It would probably have been good to also have a shading device for the upper floor - possibly extending the roof overhang.

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  3. Intriguing use of a silo. How much did it cost? My husband and I are looking to have our own ranch/farm and this seems like an appropriate style home.

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  4. kaye,
    I'm not sure of the cost on the building. If I am able to track it down, I'll let you know.

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  5. I love it. I want to create a clothing store in a similar fashion. was the planning and construction process difficult?

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  6. Beautiful :-) I have seen a few silo homes online and I wondered if anyone ever considered berming them?

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  7. I seriously think this is one of the coolest things ever! I'd love to get a little more work and experience with grain bins in Ohio. Nest month my grandpa needs help replacing some old ones, I'd love to look like I kind of know what I'm dong!

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